typo
authoraaronshaw <aaron.d.shaw@gmail.com>
Tue, 29 Sep 2020 17:24:19 +0000 (12:24 -0500)
committeraaronshaw <aaron.d.shaw@gmail.com>
Tue, 29 Sep 2020 17:24:19 +0000 (12:24 -0500)
psets/pset1-worked_solution.html
psets/pset1-worked_solution.pdf
psets/pset1-worked_solution.rmd

index bd80eb7d73e5081691798f691416cce045ac8929..354e4e9413fa4ded79b18360966adc963f03f8a9 100644 (file)
@@ -1803,7 +1803,7 @@ p + geom_histogram()</code></pre>
 <h2>Statistical questions</h2>
 <div id="sq1" class="section level3">
 <h3>SQ1</h3>
-<p>A compelling answer to this depends on the variable you chose. For the one I looked at in my example code (<code>poverty</code>) the data is somewhat right skewed, but not much. In this case, the mean and standard deviation should represent the central tendency and spread of the variable pretty well. If your variable was different (e.g., one of the population or income measures, it would probably be good to also examine and report the median and interquartile range. See <code>OpenIntro</code> chapter 2 for more on distinctions/reasons behind this.</p>
+<p>A compelling answer to this depends on the variable you chose. For the one I looked at in my example code (<code>poverty</code>) the data is somewhat right skewed, but not much. In this case, the mean and standard deviation should represent the central tendency and spread of the variable pretty well. If your variable was different (e.g., one of the population or income measures), it would probably be good to also examine and report the median and interquartile range. See <code>OpenIntro</code> chapter 2 for more on distinctions/reasons behind this.</p>
 </div>
 <div id="sq2" class="section level3">
 <h3>SQ2</h3>
index ab64c3db95f88ab108907a99364aad15e6731574..a2b5b895ea6c7486c5b3a0edd5b3d578447c7c84 100644 (file)
Binary files a/psets/pset1-worked_solution.pdf and b/psets/pset1-worked_solution.pdf differ
index ef425ba65356daec5733eb7eb9a935fe01cd6839..06b227ef80309142efd5aae4abada923d7cb7dce 100644 (file)
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ Note that ggplot2 generates a warning about 5 "non-fininte values." In this case
 
 ### SQ1
 
-A compelling answer to this depends on the variable you chose. For the one I looked at in my example code (`poverty`) the data is somewhat right skewed, but not much. In this case, the mean and standard deviation should represent the central tendency and spread of the variable pretty well. If your variable was different (e.g., one of the population or income measures, it would probably be good to also examine and report the median and interquartile range. See `OpenIntro` chapter 2 for more on distinctions/reasons behind this.
+A compelling answer to this depends on the variable you chose. For the one I looked at in my example code (`poverty`) the data is somewhat right skewed, but not much. In this case, the mean and standard deviation should represent the central tendency and spread of the variable pretty well. If your variable was different (e.g., one of the population or income measures), it would probably be good to also examine and report the median and interquartile range. See `OpenIntro` chapter 2 for more on distinctions/reasons behind this.
 
 ### SQ2
 

Community Data Science Collective || Want to submit a patch?